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Full text of "Pencil studies"

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•DRAWIM6-BG0KS 

BY MODERN ARTISTS 



BY CHAF^LES I^OWBOTHAM. 




WITH INSTRUCTIONS BY THE ARTIST 

IN PARTS, ONE SHILLING EACH 

LONDON: WINSOR & NEWTON, LIMITED 
38, RATHBONE PLACE, OXFORD STREET W. 




ONE SHILLING HANDBOOKS ON ART. 

mit^ Illustrations, ^t. 



SENT BY POST ON RECEIPT OF FOURTEEN STAMPS. 



*#* In ordering :t is sufficient to mention the Number wtiich is attached to each Book. 

No. 



1.— Half-Hour Lectures on Drawing and 
Painting. 

2.— The Art of Sketching from Nature. 

3.— The Art of Landscape Painting in 
Water-Colours. 

4.— System of Water-Colour Painting. 

6.— The Art of Marine Painting in 
Water-Colours. 

6.— Hints for Sketching in Water-Colour 
from Nature. 

7.— The Art of Portrait Painting in 
Water-Colours. 

8.— The Art of Miniature Painting. 

9.— The Art of Flower Painting. 

10.— The Art of Landscape Painting in 
Oil-Colours. 

11.— The Art of Portrait Painting in 
Oil-Colours. 

12. -The Art of Marine Painting in 
Oil-Colours. 



13.— The Elements of Perspective. 
14.— The Art of Botanical Drawing. 
15.— A Manual of Illumination. 



16.— A Companion to Manual of 
Illumination. 



17.— The Art of Figure Drawing. 



18.— An Artistic Treatise on the Human 
Figure. 

19.— Artistic Anatomy of the Human 
Figure. 

20.— Artistic Anatomy of the Dog and 
Deer. 



21.— The Artistic Anatomy of the Horse. 
22.— The Artistic Anatomy of Cattle and 



23.— The Art of Painting and Drawing 
in Coloured Crayons. 

24.— The Art of Mural Decoration. 

25.— Transparency Painting on Linen. 

26.— The Art of Transparent Painting 
on Glass. 

27.— The Principles of Colouring in 
Painting. 

28.— The Principles of Form in 
Ornamental Art. 



29.— The Art of Wood Engraving. 

30.— Instructions for.Cleanmg, Repairing, 
Lining, and Restoring Oil Paintings. 

31.— Drawing Models and their Uses. 

32.— Comparative Anatomy as Applied 
to the Purposes of the Artist. 

33.-The Art of Etching. 



WINSOR & NEWTON, Limited, 38, Rathbone Place, LONDON, W. 

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS AND ARTISTS' COLOURMEN. 



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PENCIL STUDIES, 



BY 

CHARLES ROWBOTHAM. 



THE subjects of the following Sketches are taken fi-om the beach, which, in affording so 
many picturesque objects for study, forms a valuable sketching-ground for the artist. 
Of the many useful spots that are to be met with on our coasts, Hastings, with its quaint 
huts and fishing boats, is a fair example. Here the artist may find free scope for testing his 
abilities, in an abundance of good material for his sketch-book. 

The first of the two following sketches from Hastings beach represents a fishing boat — 
an example of beach-study that demands careful treatment on the part of the student. He 
should commence by putting in the line of the horizon, as this will assist him in securing the 
proper inclination of the boat. Having next ascertained the exact positions and relative 
proportions of the objects comprised in the sketch, their general form should be lightly sketched 
in. Next, the planking of the boat should be indicated, care being taken to preserve the 
gradual increase and decrease in width of the planks as they extend from stem to stern. 

The masts and rigging may now be introduced, together with the net slung over the side 
of the boat, the side ropes, &c. The distant breakwater having likewise been indicated, the 
student may proceed to put in the outline of the boat in a firm, clear manner, and then, with a 
soft pencil, give shape and roundness to the craft by introducing boldly the shadow underneath, 
as also that thrown by the overhanging nets. 

The shadows beneath each plank, as it overlaps the one below it, may next be put in 
with firm and effective strokes, the result being to impart a natural appearance to the surface 
of the boat. 

The net should now be toned, and the netting indicated by sharp lines here and there. 
This done, the interior of the boat may be proceeded with, decided touches being given to the 
different portions where needed. The canvas lying on the fore-deck, the mizen mast, sail, <S:c , 
having received due attention, and the shingled beach suggested by vigorous touches, the 
sketch should present a very fair copy of the original. 

THE practice that the student will have gained from the preceding study should enable him 
to do battle with the somewhat more difficult subject presented by our second sketch. 
The same course of procedure must be followed with this as in the first subject. The 
horizontal line and the relative positions and proportions having been determined, and a firm 
and careful outline made, the student may proceed to deal with the several boats in the fore- 
ground, carefully noting that whilst the upper line of the foremost craft is concave, that of the 
boat immediately behind it is convex in appearance ; the difference arising from the fact that 
the first boat is inclined towards the spectator, whilst the position of the second is reversed. 
The masts, &c., having been introduced, together with the hut and netting in the foreground, 
the shading may be proceeded with, commencing with the foremost boat and the capstan. 
The prow of the boat should be put in with a soft pencil, and the shadow beneath being carried 
along to the stern, with deep touches indicating the timber lying by its side, the netting slung 
over the stern, and the reclining mast. 




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WINSOR & N EWTON'S DRAW ING PENCILS. 

Messrs Winsor & Newton, Limited, beg to draw attention to their Drawing Pencils, the range of 
which consists of a good PENNY Pencil for Schools and ordinary use ; a TWOPENNY Pencil for Students ; 
a THREEPENNY Pencil, of hexagon form, for Offices and Artists ; a FOURPENNY Pencil, Cumberland 
lead, free from grit and yielding colour readily ; a FIVEPENNY Pencil (hexagon) ; containing plumbago of 
the highest quality and adapted for Engineers, where thin and perfect lines and ready erasure are essential ; 
and a SIXPENNY Pencil, made expressly for the use of Artists, with an extra quantity of Cumberland lead. 
These pencils retain the fine qualities of erasure and colour of the original celebrated Lead. 

DESCRIPTION OF DEGREES. 

HHHH- Extremely hard (for Engineering or Drawing on Wood). 

HHH. Very hard for (Architectural Drawing). 

HH. Hard for fine (Outline Drawing). 

H. Moderately hard (for light sketching). 

PP. Very firm (for light shading). 

P. Firm (for fine drawing). 

HB. Moderately hard and black (for free sketching). 

B. Black (for ordinary shading). 

BB. Soft black (for deep shading). 

EHB. Hard and black, extra size lead (for bold sketching). 

BBB. Very black, extra size lead (for deep shading). 

BBBB. Soft and black extra size lead (for full, rich, deep shading). 



WINSOR & NEWTON'S PENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 

POLISHED RED CEDAR. 
These Pencils are of good quality and are adapted foi School, Office, or Shop use. They are supplied 
in four degrees, H, HB, B, and BB, stamped in silver " Winsor and Newton's Penny Pencil." 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S TWOPENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 

IMPROVED POLISHED CEDAR. 
These improved Dr-awing Pencils are strongly recommended for their, richness of colour and variety 
and evenness of tint. They combine freedom of handling with great firmness, and may be cut to the finest 
point without fear of being broken. These Pencils are now in general use with Artists and Professors of 
eminence, on whose recommendation they have been adopted by Schools of Art, Colleges, and large Drawing. 
Academies throughout the World. Th^y are supplied in twelve degrees, HHHH, HHH, HH, H, FF, F, 
HB, B; BB, EHB, BBB, and BBBB, stamped in gold, " Winsob and Newton." 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S THREEPENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 

HEXAGON SHAPE, IN POLISHED RED CEDAR. 
These Pencils are admirably adapted for the use of Architects and Draughtsmen. Their shape prevents 
them rolling from a desk. They are supplied in five degrees — BB, HB, H, HH, HHH. 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S FOURPENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 

IN PLAIN CEDAR. 
These Drawing Pencils are manufactured of the finest Lead, warranted perfectly free from Grit. They 
yield colour readily, which can be easily removed with India rubber. They also work smoothly and evenly 
and maybe handled with perfect freedom. Supplied in twelve degrees— HHHH, HHH, HH, H, FF, F, 
HB, B, BB, ErlB, BBB, and BBBB. 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S FIVEPENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 

HEXAGON SHAPE, IN POLISHED CEDAR. 
These Pencils are of very high quality ; in colour, smoothness, and ready erasure they cannot be surpassed. 

FOR ENGINEERS' AND ARCHITECTS' USE. 
They are supplied in thirteen degrees-HHHHHH, HHHH, HHH, HH, H, FF, F, HB, B, BB, 
EHB, BBB, and BBBB. 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S SIXPENNY DRAWING PENCILS. 
Extra Thick Cumberland Lead. 

IN PLAIN CEDAR. 
These Drawinp Pencils are manufactured of the finest Lead, warranted perfectly free from grit, and 
contain a larger quantity of Lead than usual. They give forth a good volume of colour, which can be readily 
removed when necessary with India rubber. Extra Cumberland Lead Pencils are supplied in twelve degrees 
HHHH, HHH, HH, H, FK, F, HB, B, BB, EHB, BBB, and BBBB, blind stamped, " Extra Cumberland Lead, 
Winsor and nV.wto'n." with Trade Mark (a Griffin). 




JAPAN N ED TIN^OXe/ 

yvvoiST Watep^Goloup^s in whole \ Half Pans. 




3 Whole Pan Box, Pitted 

D///0, Empty, 3I6 

i Whole. Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, 3lg 

6 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, 4I- 

8 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, 4I6 

10 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, s/j 

12 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, sjg 

U Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, 6J3 

16 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, 6/9 

18 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, yl6 

20 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, Sj- 

24 Whole Pan Box, Fitted • • 

Ditto, Empty, gj- 

30 Whole Pan Box, Fitted 

Ditto, Empty, rij- 



£ s. d. 
7 



8 6 



10 6 



14 



16 6 



19 



1 3 6 



1 12 6 



1 16 6 



2 5 



3 10 



£ s. c/. 

6 Half Pan Box, Fitted 7 

D/tto, /'Jmpty, ,7/9 

8 Half Pan Box, Fitted 9 

Ditto, Empty, 4/j 

10 Half Pan Box, Fitted 10 6 

Ditto, Empty, ^jq 

12 Half Pan Box, Fitted 12 

Ditto, Empty, ^/j 

14 Half Pan Box, Fitted 13 6 

Ditto, Empty, 5/9 

16 Half Pan Box, Fitted 16 

Ditto, Empty, 6/- 
18 Half Pan Box, Fitted 18 6 

Ditto, Empty, 616 
20 Half Pan Box, Fitted 12 

Ditto, Empty, 7/- 
24 Half Pan Box, Fitted 17 

Ditto, Empty, yl6 

WINSOR & NEWTON'S 

MINIATURE JAPANNED TIN BOXES, 

Fitted with Moist Water Colours. 

£ s. d. I 

Box containing 6 Colours 4 6 ' 

Ditto 8 ditto 5 6 ^ 



Ditto 10 ditto 

Ditto 12 ditto 

Ditto 14 ditto 

Ditto 16 ditto 



7 6 C, 
8 
9 



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